beautiesofafrique

devilthrones:

"For one thing, there’s Dido’ fetishization by the two Ashford brothers. While one brother sees her simply as an exotic "other" whom he can bed without forming attachments — very different from the attitude toward white women of the same time period, whose virtue was unequivocal and untouchable — the other is downright violent in his conception of Dido, calling her "repulsive" but still expressing a desire to rape her. The scenes in which that older, more violent Ashford brother addresses Dido directly, giving voice to his unbridled racism and at one point assaulting her, are indisputably disturbing, not just because they represent a disgusting and brutal history but because I see remnants of those attitudes today in the way the world perceives the bodies of black and brown women: exotic, sexual, sensual, different objects. We see it in the way Miley Cyrus and almost any given white pop star (Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke, for example) use black women’s bodies as props in music videos: as something to be appropriated and used for one’s own pleasure and then cast off in pursuit of the next trend. In addition, the rape of black women still does not seem to carry much horror in 2014; it was most recently a punchline on Saturday Night Live, and last year Russell Simmons was forced to apologize for his highly offensive "Harriet Tubman Sex Tape." None of this is too different from the way the Ashford brothers perceive Dido’s body: as an exotic "other" not worthy of love or respect but merely of lust, and lust framed in a particularly problematic racism."

 Belle: A Lesson in the Timelessness of Racism and Misogyny Against Black Women by Olivia Cole 

psych2go

jag-me-baby:

psych2go:

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The second one is VERY important; *** being ostracized is more mentally damaging than being bullied. ***

Don’t know how many ways I can say this; being told “go away”, ignored completely when you speak, being chosen last for teams all say “you are worthless to us”

Kids think they are being nicer by not picking on someone that annoys them, and they are right. However, at least when a child is being picked on, however horribly, it means their existence has been noticed and has caused a reaction.

The cool kids hate it when the teachers pick the teams or assign students to work together in group. The ostracized kids are always relieved (of course by this point many would rather work alone after years of being rebuffed). 

We need to teach our children not only to not bully and belittle, but to also be inclusive; to respond in some sort of non-negative way to kids they would rather ignore. It’s not easy, but being told by a peer that they are worthy of positive notice could improve - and maybe even save - a life.